Jharkhand Journal of Development and Management Studies

(A Quarterly Review of Development and Management Trends)

A National Journal Indexed in the UGC-CARE List

Forthcoming Issues

Jobless Growth and Unemployment - A Global Phenomenon (July-September 2024)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th August 2024)

Ethnic Communities and Collective Action (October-December 2024)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th November 2024)

The National Education Policy 2020 and Forms of Exclusion (January-March 2025)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th February 2025)

Trans–Empirical Research in Ayurveda Medicine (April-June 2025)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th May 2025)

NGOs Works on Crating Skills, Competencies and Livelihoods for under-privileged Children across the Country (July-September 2025)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th August 2025)

Balance between Agriculture and Industry in Economic Development (October-December 2025)

(Last date of articles submission on or before 15th November 2025)

For any query please contact on emails at: jjdms.xiss@gmail.com and jjdms@xiss.ac.in



Call for Papers

Vol. 22, No. 3, July-September 2024

Theme : Jobless Growth and Unemployment - A Global Phenomenon

The current theme has two broader perspectives – “global jobless growth” and “global unemployment and underemployment”, which need to be looked at globally today. It is a well-established fact that unemployment and underemployment are rising worldwide, generally unmitigated and increasingly made worse by “jobless growth globally”. The Human Development Report 2024 has rightly pointed out that “many parts of the world are witnessing a new phenomenon, “jobless growth”. The report further said that up until March 2024, an extra ten million workers were expected to be looking for jobs, raising the global unemployment rate from 5.1 per cent in 2023 to 5.2 per cent. While the job gap rate in 2023 was 8.2 per cent in high-income countries, it stood at 20.5 per cent in the low-income countries. Similarly, while the 2023 unemployment rate persisted at 4.5 per cent in high- income countries, it was 5.7 per cent in low-income countries. In the Indian scenario, unemployment and underemployment have always been important issues in post- Independence India. We have always been a primarily agrarian, labour-surplus economy with low capital stock that has manifested in low industrial productivity and a largely non- remunerative, monsoon-dependent agricultural economy. The Indian planners held the view that economic growth would automatically lead to the creation of jobs in the above sectors. Hence, core policies and institutions should be built to create more opportunities to involve complementary actions to stimulate overall growth, particularly job creation for the poor through credit, facilities, and infrastructural developments, including electricity, for the benefit of the poor. Moreover, social and institutional barriers should be removed. The security of the poor should be enhanced by reducing their vulnerability to economic shocks, natural disasters, ill health, and personal violence. The government has to create a conducive environment for the poor to get jobs and build intelligence.


Considering the scope, depth, and significance of the problems, the broader topic of this special theme has been designed to make comprehensive fieldwork research further based on the above evidence by dividing it into the following sub-themes:

  1. Worldwide Discourse on Jobless Growth and Unemployment in a Conceptual Framework
  2. Nature and Magnitude of Jobless Growth and Unemployment in the Developed and Developing Countries
  3. Technological Unemployment and their Remedies: A Global Phenomenon
  4. Growing Unemployment and Underemployment Rates in India during the Five Year Plans
  5. Core Policies of the Government of India towards Solving the Unemployment and Underemployment Problems
  6. Institutional Barriers in Creation of New Jobs for Youth
  7. Any other topic closely related to Jobless Growth and Unemployment and directions for future research.

Interested scholars may submit their scholarly papers by mail to the Associate Editor (jjdms@xiss.ac.in) as per the guidelines of the journal (see https://www.xiss.ac.in/JJDMS/guidelines-to-authors-for-research-articles), on or before August 15, 2024, provided they fulfil the following criteria for further processing: (i) the work is original and self-regulated without plagiarism; (ii) the citations and references are correct, using APA style; (iii) the article does not show uneven scholarly quality; (iv) the language and grammar are checked; (v) the article is rigorously edited by a professional copyeditor; (vi) not exceeding 5000 words, including an abstract of 150 words only. A complimentary copy of the printed version will be provided to the corresponding author only.


Note: Moreover, we have identified and developed some new areas/themes of national importance for the forthcoming issues of JJDMS up to October-December 2025, whose details are given below. Scholars may contribute their research papers on the mentioned themes in advance.


THEMES FOR THE FORTHCOMING ISSUES:

  1. Ethnic Communities and Collective Action (October-December 2024)
  2. The National Education Policy 2020 and Forms of Exclusion (January-March 2025)
  3. Trans–Empirical Research in Ayurveda Medicine (April-June 2025)
  4. NGOs Works on Crating Skills, Competencies and Livelihoods for under-privileged Children across the Country (July-September 2025)
  5. Balance between Agriculture and Industry in Economic Development (October-December 2025)

Prof (Dr.) Anirudh Prasad

Founder Editor

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